https://dfemedia.blog.gov.uk/2017/01/12/education-in-the-media-12-january-2016/

Education in the media: 12 January 2016

Today’s news review looks at the report published by the Higher Education Policy Institute (HEPI) into the effect of Brexit on UK universities, as well as Lord Laming’s comments on children in care.

HEPI

Today, Thursday 12 January, the Higher Education Policy Institute released a report that examines the effect Brexit and other global changes could have on the number of international students attending UK universities. As reported in the Guardian, TES, the i and the FT, the report claimed that Brexit could reduce the total number of students from overseas, although tuition fee income could rise by £187 million.

The Department has been clear that EU students starting their courses in 2017/2018 or before will continue to be eligible for student loans and home fee status for the duration of their course. Student survey data for UK universities shows very high satisfaction rates for our international students.

A Department for Education spokesperson said

EU and international students, staff and researchers make an important contribution to our higher education sector and we want that to continue. The UK has a long established system that supports and attracts the brightest minds, at all stages of their career, and the government will seek to secure the best deal for universities and their staff when negotiations for exiting the EU begin.

 

The UK remains one of the most popular destinations for students globally and we want this to continue, which is why there are no plans to cap the number of international students who can come to study in the UK.

Children in Care

BBC Breakfast ran a report this morning based on comments from Lord Laming on children in care. In the report he said that while he admired foster carers, he was concerned that the range of facilities available is narrowing.

However, the coverage did not fully reflect that the Government is committed to ensuring foster carers and support staff in children’s homes receive the training, development and resources they need.

We have funded and tested new and innovative models of foster care through the £100 million Children's Social Care Innovation Programme. This includes the Mockingbird Family model and other projects that focus on specialist foster care and training for foster carers.

A Department for Education spokesperson said:

Our care planning guidance makes clear that any decisions made about care placements must be made in the best interest of the child. In weighing up the different options, a number of issues must be considered, the most important of which is the need to ask how placement will meet the needs of an individual child given their previous history, current circumstances and the circumstances of their family.

 

The Government is committed to ensuring that foster carers and support staff in children’s homes receive the training, development and resources they need.

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