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https://dfemedia.blog.gov.uk/2020/11/26/the-departments-commitment-rewarding-teachers/

The Department’s commitment rewarding teachers

Posted by: , Posted on: - Categories: Teacher pay

a teacher holding a paper he is marking, and looking quite happy with himself about it

This year, we announced the biggest pay rise the teaching profession has seen since 2005, with above-inflation rises to the pay ranges for every single teacher in the country. This September 2020 pay award was worth 3.1% on average, recognising the vital role teachers are playing in protecting children's futures.

Although the public sector pay freeze announced by the Chancellor yesterday does affect teachers in 2021/22, pay rises from performance related progression and promotion will continue. In recent years, around a third of experienced teachers who were earning below the maximum of their pay range received a pay rise over and above the pay award, due to progression or promotion. Early career teachers are typically eligible for performance related pay progression each year.

We remain committed to achieving a £30k starting salary for teachers. Although a pay restraint means progress towards this salary commitment is slower, this year starting salaries have already increased by 5.5%.

On top of this, Academies are free to set their own pay policies for teachers and will not be affected by yesterday’s announcement. Academies now account for more than 50% of state school pupils.

A Department for Education spokesperson said:

This year we announced the biggest pay rise the teaching profession has seen since 2005, with above-inflation rises to the pay ranges for every single teacher in the country. We are also committed to introducing a £30,000 starting salary.

Teaching remains an attractive and rewarding career with the opportunity to inspire and shape the lives of millions of pupils. Our reforms to teacher training, early career support, ongoing professional development and teachers’ pay are key to the Government’s plans to raise school standards.

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